A colloquialism to describe a holding with a long Club suit, generally a 6-card suit, and insufficient values for game after a No Trump opening by partner. The second designation, a Diamond bust referring to the other Minor, is also a colloquialism used in the bridge community. The origin of such a method is unknown, but it is rumored that the average bridge player devised this method following the introduction of transfer bids.

Principle of the Concept

The principle behind this agreement by competition is the fact that the next player in rotation has the opportunity to interfere frequently when holding specific patterns and shapes. If the overcall is either 2 Clubs, or 2 Diamonds, or 2 Hearts, then the partner of the No Trump bidder simply bids 2 Spades to transfer to Clubs on the three level. If the overcall indeed interferes with a 2 Spades overcall, then the partner of the No Trump bidder simply doubles to trigger the method.

     
     

Illustrations of the Concept

The conventional methods are illustrated to clarify this action at the bridge table and the various partnership agreements on how to deal with such holdings:

Example 1   Club Bust   Example 2   Diamond Bust
Opener   Responder   Opener   Responder
KQ75
A96
A842
A8
 
864
105
75
QJ8653
 
KQ75
A96
A74
A86
 
864
105
QJ8653
75
1 NT   2   1 NT   2
3   Pass   3   3
        Pass    

The partnership agreement is that the partnership has agreed to play Four Suit Transfers. The first bid by the responder is, per partnership agreement, a transfer to Clubs. This agreement allows the partnership to employ the 2 Clubs first response as the Stayman convention and the 3 Clubs first response as the conventional method of attempting a Minor suit slam.

In the original concept of Four Suit Transfers, a first response of 2 No Trump signifies a transfer to Diamonds, but since this action removed the natural response of 2 No Trump indicating 8/9 points and invitation to 3 No Trump, the approach has been adopted to include the action of first transferring to Clubs and then correcting to Diamonds. This approach allows the partnership more flexibility.

This auction has become known in the bridge community as a Club Bust, Example 1, or a Diamond Bust, Example 2.

Side Note: The reader should be made aware that some partnerships have also agreed, as in both examples, to treat the 2 as Minor Suit Stayman. These partnerships do not employ the Four Suit Transfers. It is not possible to play both conventional methods.

Alternative Agreement

However, there are partnership agreements which employ the first response of 2 No Trump as a transfer to Clubs as shown in the following example:

Example 3   Club Bust   Example 4   Diamond Bust
Opener   Responder   Opener   Responder
KQ75
A96
A842
A8
 
864
105
75
QJ8653
 
KQ75
A96
A74
A86
 
864
105
QJ8653
75
1 NT   2 NT   1 NT   2
3   Pass   3   3
        Pass    

In Example 3 the responder bids 2 No Trump per partnership agreement, and this requires the No Trump bidder to bid 3 Clubs, not 3 Diamonds, which would be the normal response to Four Suit Transfers. This agreement allows the responder to pass 3 Clubs or to correct to 3 Diamonds. This action is also known as showing a Club Bust or a Diamond Bust, meaning insufficient values for game.

Alternative Agreement

Some partnership agreements employ the first response of 3 Clubs, and/or 3 Diamonds, to show a Club Bust or a Diamond Bust as shown in the following examples:

Example 5   Club Bust   Example 6   Diamond Bust
Opener   Responder   Opener   Responder
KQ75
A96
A842
A8
 
864
105
75
QJ8653
 
KQ75
A96
A74
A86
 
864
105
QJ8653
75
1 NT   3   1 NT   3
Pass       Pass    

In Example 5 the 3 Clubs is showing weakness and insufficient values for game. The No Trump bidder is forced to pass per partnership agreement. The same holds true in Example 6 when the first response is 3 Diamonds.

Additional Agreements

Some partnership agreements include the use of the Stayman convention first with the first response of 2 Clubs to seemingly ask for a 4-card Major suit and whatever the response of the No Trump bidder is to bid either 3 Clubs and/or 3 Diamonds, to show a Club Bust or a Diamond Bust as shown in the following examples:

Example 6   Club Bust   Example 7   Diamond Bust   Example 8   Diamond Bust
Opener   Responder   Opener   Responder   Opener   Responder
KQ75
A96
A842
A8
 
864
105
75
QJ8653
 
KQ75
A96
A74
A86
 
864
105
QJ8653
75
 
KQ7
A96
A74
A864
 
864
105
QJ8653
75
1 NT   2   1 NT   2   1 NT   2
2 (any)   3   2 or   3   2   Pass
Pass       Pass            

In Example 6, the responder will show a Club Bust, per partnership agreement by rebidding 3 Clubs. In Example 7, the responder will bid 3 Diamonds only if the response of the No Trump bidder is 2 Hearts or 2 Spades. If the response is 2 Diamonds, then the responder will pass, as in Example 8.

There may be other variations to this theme, which are not included here. If any visitor would like to contribute to this section, please do.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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