This method of discovering whether game is worth exploring and perhaps is a possibility after a one level raise of a Major suit, especially Spades, was devised by Mr. Peter I. Nagy. He was born in Budapest, Hungary, escaped Communist Hungary in the year 1957 with his uncle and immigrated to Montreal, Canada. He served as the District 1 Representative to ACBL, and also a member of the Board of Gobvernors from the year 1979 to the year 1982.

 

He was born in the year 1942 and died in the year 2003. His long-time bridge partner preserves a website in his honor online. He became a Life Master of the World Bridge Federation. Several of his career victories on the international level are listed below.

Event Year Team Mates
Men's BAM Teams 1978 Neil Chambers, Eric Kokish, Steve Robinson, John Schermer, Kit Woolsey
Vanderbilt 1993 Howard Weinstein, Dan Morse, John Sutherlin, Tom Sanders, Russ Arnold
Vanderbilt Second 1980 Ron Andersen, Mark Feldman, Eric Kokish
Spingold Second 1982 Ron Molson, Billy Cohen, Eric Kokish

Mr. Alan Truscott, the long-time bridge columnist for The New York Times, reported in his bridge column published May 22, 2003, on the death of Mr. Peter I. Nagy at the card table, playing poker, at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States. This bridge column has only been archived and preserved on this site in .pdf file format for future reference.

     

Concept of Nagy Game Tries

The following schematic clarifies and explains this method.

Opener Responder Meaning
1 2
2 NT Nagy Game Try: this rebid asks in which suit the responder would accept a help suit game try.
3 The responder would accept the Club suit as a help suit game try.
3 If the opener rebids Diamonds, this is a help suit in the Diamond suit.
3 If the opener rebids Hearts, this is a help suit in the Heart suit.
2 NT 3 The responder would accept the Diamond suit as a help suit game try, and deny the Club suit at the same time.
  3 The responder rejects both Minor suits as a help suit game try, and accepts the Heart suit.
  3 The responder rejects all lower suits and, by inference, has no help in any side suit.
  3 NT This response is natural and asks opener to select either a No Trump contract or a game contract in Spades.
  4 This response is considered a cuebid. The general meaning is that the responder holds a singleton or a void. Partnership agreement.
  4 This response is considered a cuebid. The general meaning is that the responder holds a singleton or a void. Partnership agreement.
  4 This response is considered a cuebid. The general meaning is that the responder holds a singleton or a void. Partnership agreement.
  4 This response indicates that the responder has help in all side-suits and bids game to indicate no interest in any slam try. This response is theoretically possible, but the normal response would be 3 No Trump.
   
1 2  
3 This indicates the start of a short suit game try.
3 This indicates the start of a short suit game try.
3 This indicates the start of a short suit game try.
3 By partnership agreement this first rebid can indicate:
 
  1. a power game try.
  2. a trump game try.
  3. a 1-2-3 stop bidding auction with no outside suit help.
3 NT The opener offers the responder a choice of game either in No Trump or in Spades.
4 This is a long-suit, not help-suit, slam try and promises a 5-card Club suit and a good hand.
4 This is a long-suit, not help-suit, slam try and promises a 5-card Diamond suit and a good hand.
   
1 2  
2 In this bidding sequence with Hearts as the trump suit, a rebid of 2 Spades becomes the Nagy Game Try: this rebid asks in which suit the responder would accept a help suit game try. The responses are as above with the exception that a response and/or rebid in Spades indicates Spades. 2 No Trump then becomes a short suit try in Spades and 3 Spades is a natural bid.
  After short suit tries, a repeat of the short suit try is a void suit slam try. A different suit beyond 3 of a Major suit is a cuebid and shows a short suit slam try with a singleton.
  After 2 No Trump, opener's new suits above 3 of a Major suit show a help suit slam try, probably in an accepted suit, and are cuebids.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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