DESCHAPELLES COUP

Mr. Alexandre Louis Honore Lebreton, also known during his lifetime as Guillaume le Breton, lived between 1780 and 1847. He was born in France and became an expert in the upper society of his era in the game of Whist. Even his international peers praised his knowledge and expertise of the game. One was Mr. James Clay, the leading Whist authority of England, who referred to him as the Whist player beyond any comparison the world has ever seen. It seems that Alexandre Louis Honore Lebreton also excelled at almost every sport played by the aristocrats of his time. Among them are billiards, chess, and Polish draughts, which is a form of checkers. Even after losing his right arm during one of the many wars fought in his lifetime, Alexandre Louis Honore Lebreton continued to play Whist. He devised the card coup which bears his name, and a number of other coups. He also published fragmented articles on an extensive book planned covering the many facets of the game of Whist. He never finished the project.

AQ105
AJ
8754
863
32
Q86
KQJ963
75
98764
K1075
A
A42
KJ
9432
102
KQJ109
South is the declarer. The contract is 3 No Trump. West leads the King of Diamonds. Since East has only the Ace of Diamonds, East overtakes, and must decide upon a return lead. The only hope of defeating the contract is for East to assume that West has an outside Queen. If East assumes that West has the Queen of Clubs, then the contract will be defeated in any case. However, this inference should not mislead East in leading a Club. According to Alexandre Louis Honore Lebreton, the assumption should be that West holds the Queen of Hearts. East, in order to establish an entry for West must lead the Kings of Hearts, the Deschapelles Coup.

South will accept the trick by playing the Ace of Hearts, attempt to set up the Clubs, but East overtakes with the Ace of Clubs, and leads back another Heart. West wins, and runs the Diamonds. If South ducks the first Heart, West will eventually be able to use his Queen of Hearts as an entry and run the Diamonds before South collects nine tricks. By most favorable defense, South can be held to five total tricks. Any other play by East on the second trick allows South to fulfill the contract.

It must also be noted that if the assumption by East that West holds the Queen of Clubs is correct, then by proper defense, South still can be held to only eight tricks: 4 Spade tricks, 3 Heart tricks, 1 Club trick. It should also be noted that, using the example presented above, that the only safe contract is 3 Clubs by South. Only through improper defense could a contract of 3 No Trump be made.

 

Add .pdf file from Alan Truscott - Sunday, June 7, 1987.

 

 

 

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 

 

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