PUDDING RAISE IN ACOL

The origin of this conventional method is unknown. The usage is more or less confined to those bridge players employing the Acol bidding system as opposed to bridge players employing Standard American, which is played more in North America. Source: Pudding Raise.

The purpose behind the Pudding Raise is illustrated by the following two holdings, whereby the auction, using basic Acol, is identical.

Example 1:

South

West

North

East

1

Pass

4

Pass

Pass

Pass

KQ76
AQ4
Q85
Q43

 

Example 2:

South

West

North

East

1

Pass

4

Pass

Pass

Pass

KQ764
93
Q9763
8

In Example 1 the holding contains values between 13 and 15 high card points and support for the suit of partner, who opened the auction with 1. In the case that the opener, South, holds additional values, then South may be able to attempt a slam either in Spades or even No Trump.

Example 2, however, is different even though the response is identical. North holds only 7 high card points and 3 distributional points for a total of 10 points. But according to the Losing Trick Count method the holding is worth an immediate raise to 4 using basic Acol responses. The holding contains only 6 Losing Tricks. Compared with Example 1, which also contains only 6 Losing Tricks, the first response for both holdings should be an immediate raise to game in the Major suit.

The reason for the immediate raise to game also in Example 2, using basic Acol, is the preemptive value of the raise itself. The opponents are perhaps more unwilling to compete on the five level after such a fast approach in a Major suit.

 

The difficulty arises with the opener after this identical auction since the opener is not quite certain as to the either - or situation of the holding of the responder. The question for the opener is whether the responder has bid game on high card points and winning tricks or is the game raise based solely on Losing Trick Count.

Assuming the following holding by opener in Example 1 and compare with Example 2:

Example 1:

South

West

North

East

1

Pass

4

Pass

A1082
K8
AK76
K75

Pass

KQ76
AQ4
Q85
Q43

 

Example 2:

South

West

North

East

1

Pass

4

Pass

A1082
K8
AK76
K75

Pass

KQ764
93
Q9763
8

The bridge player will realize very quickly that the opener, South, can continue the auction to a final contract of 6 with confidence in Example 1. A possible final contract of 6 No Trump is also a safe possibility after the pertinent information has been exchanged.

However, the bridge player, in Example 2, will immediately realize that there is no chance at all to make 6. This is the crux of the problem with these two auctions, one using point count and distributional values and the other using the Losing Trick Count method.

 

The Pudding Raise was devised and developed to address this particular circumstance and this particular situational bidding sequence. The Pudding Raise shows and promises a holding with a 4-card support for partner's Major suit, a range of 13 to 15 high card points plus distributional points, and shows neither a singleton nor a void.

Note: only the partnership can decide and agree whether or not to use and employ Pudding Raises also for the two Minor suits, and whether they apply if an opponent opens the auction first and one partner overcalls. The partnership must also decide whether Pudding Raises find application if the opening is a Minor suit, the responder bids a Major suit, and partner raises immediately to game. These particular situations should be discussed.

Employing the Pudding Raise the partnership can employ the immediate game raise only with distributional holdings as a preemptive action.

Therefore, in Example 1 the partnership would have the following auction:

Example 1:

South

West

North

East

1

Pass

3 NT

Pass

A1082
K8
AK76
K75

Pass

KQ76
AQ4
Q85
Q43

Following a first response by partner, the opener then has several available options, which he did not have if the partnership would not employ the Pudding Raise.

1. The opener can bid game in the designated suit, generally a Major suit. This shows no interest in any slam attempt.
2. The opener can and should pass the first response of 3 No Trump with an even distribution: 5-3-3-2 for example.
3. If the opener bids a new suit on the four level, then this bid is a cuebid showing moderate to strong slam ambitions. The partnership understanding should be that this bid is promising first round control in that suit and requests partner to oblige by bidding his first round control, etc.
4. A rebid by opener of 4 No Trump is Blackwood in whichever form.

As usual, there can be certain drawbacks to employing the Pudding Raise, but it overcomes a major bidding problem of basic Acol. With the Pudding Raise the partnership has one additional option, which can be used more frequently to exchange required information. In the case that the responder meets all requirements, but does not have a 4-card support in partner's suit, then the responder should first bid his own 4-card suit, not the suit of the opener, then show strength on the second round.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 

 

Email

Conventions

Links

Claus and Raymond

Conventions

Bridge Sites

 

Home Page

Glossary

Home Page

Home Page I

Glossary

Home Page II