The double grand coup is the identical to the grand coup, only with the exception that it is repeated or doubled. As a reminder, the grand coup is defined as a play, by which the declarer intentionally shortens his trump holding by ruffing a winner in order to achieve a finessing position over an adverse trump holding in an end position.

The following example was executed by Mr. Albert Silber of District 12 at the Russell Roosen Sectional in August of 1997 as reported by the Newsletter Table Talk, which is the Official Publication of the Michigan Bridge Association, Volume 50, Number 3, Fall 2009.

Note: This achievement by Mr. Albert Silber constituted the content of a bridge column authored by Mr. Alan Truscott, bridge columnist for The New York Times, on October 04, 1997, in which he describes the actions of Mr. Albert Silber for executing the double grand coup.

Note: In the bridge article, dated December 15, 1991, authored by Mr. Alan Truscott, bridge columnist for The New York Times, he describes how a new Compensation Method was reported by Mr. Albert Silber by Birmingham, Michigan, United States, who was introduced to the method by Mr. Vitold Brustunov during a visit to Leningrad, before that city reverted to its traditional name of St. Petersburg. This article has only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for future reference.

Note: The photograph of Mr. Albert Silber, who began playing the game of bridge in the year 1926 during its most early evolution, is presented below. The photograph is estimated around the year 1999, shortly before the turn of the millennium. He was born in the year 1912 and died in August 2009. Any additional photographic material of Mr. Albert Silver would be greatly appreciated.

     
     

Double Grand Coup

The following is the actual board as played by Mr. Albert Silver and as described by Mr. Alan Truscott in his bridge column and also in the above mentioned Newsletter Table Talk, which is the Official Publication of the Michigan Bridge Association, Volume 50, Number 3, Fall 2009. The board was preserved and authored by Mr. Marty Hirschman.

 
North
K7
Q64
AQJ84
Q96
 
West
8
AKJ52
K5
A5432
 
East
Q942
983
962
J87
 
South
AJ10653
107
1073
K10
 
South   West   North   East
Albert Silber            
2   3   3   Pass
4   Pass   Pass   Pass
Opening Lead: Ace

West cashes two high Hearts and the Ace of Clubs. On the fourth trick West plays a small Club to the declarer's King of Clubs. On the fifth trick the declarer, Mr. Albert Silber, plays a small Spade to the King of Spades in the dummy.

On the sixth trick Mr. Albert Silber plays the last 7 of Spades, trump, to the 10 of Spades in hand. West pitches a small Club. On the 7th trick the layout of all four directions are shown below.

 
North
 
Q
AQJ84
Q
 
West
 
J52
K5
54
 
East
Q9
9
962
J
 
South
AJ65
 
1073
 
 

The play strategy should be that the best case scenario is that East needs to hold at least three of four small Diamonds in order for the double grand coup to be executed.

Play Technique

The declarer finesses the Jack of Diamonds from hand, which proves successful. Leading the Queen of Hearts from the dummy is the next correct play, but the declarer must trump the winning Queen of Hearts with a low trump.

Again, in hand, the declarer crosses to the dummy with a Diamond finesse of West, and this action forces West to play and lose the King of Diamonds. In dummy the declarer then plays the Queen of Clubs, which the declarer trumps with the 6 of Spades. West follows suit.

 
North
 
 
Q84
 
 
West
 
J5
 
5
 
East
Q9
 
9
 
 
South
AJ
 
10
 
 

In hand the declarer then plays the 10 of Diamonds to the Queen of Diamonds in dummy. East, having the required number of Diamonds necessary for this strategy to work, plays the 9 of Diamonds.

Once this position has been reached, then the declarer leads a Diamond from dummy, East trumps either with the Queen or 9, and the declarer overtrumps accordingly, winning the last three tricks. Mr. Albert Silber executed one of the rare and definitely very infrequent double grand coup.

Date: Tuesday, January 13, 1931 - Source.

Two Too Many in Trump Suit
Declarer Forced to Make Double Grand Coup

Author: William E. McKenney

The following is a direct quote from the article of the bride columnist William E. McKenney with updated, clarifying additions.

There are times when a hand contains too many trump. When these bothersome trump can be literally discarded on high cards in dummy, this play is known as the grand coup. When one trump is discarded, it is the single grand coup. This play was shown to you in our previous article.

In today's hand the declarer must discard two trump and makes the play known as the double grand coup.

 
North
AJ10876
J8
KJ
1043
 
West
Q954
954
742
J82
 
East
3
K1076
9653
AKQ7
 
South (D)
K3
AQ32
AQ108
965
 
South   West   North (D)   East
1   Pass   1   2
2   Pass   3   Pass
4   Pass   Pass   Pass
Opening Lead: King

The hand was played at contract and South, the dealer, started the bidding with 1 Heart, West passed and North, using the one-over-one, bid 1 Spade. This bid makes no promise for game, but requires South to keep the bidding open. East bid 2 Clubs, South showed his Diamond suit by bidding 2 Diamonds, West passed and North bid 3 Spades. South carried the bidding to 4 Spades, which closed the contracting.

The Play

East's proper opening is the King of Clubs, followed by the Queen (of Clubs), and the the Ace (of Clubs). When all three players followed to the three Club leads by East, East should not continue with the 7 of Clubs as this wold get the declarer a ruff in one hand and a sluff in the other.

East shifted to a Diamond, leading the 3 spot, his fourth best, through the dummy's strength. Dummy played small and declarer won the trick with the Jack. Declarer led a small Spade to the dummy's King and returned the 3 spot from dummy, finessing the 10 spot, which held the trick.

Realizes Trouble

The declarer realizes that he cannot pick up the Queen of Spades in the West hand unless he gets rid of two extra Spades in hand. He therefore decides to try for a grand coup. He leads the King of Diamonds, overtaking in Dummy with the Ace (of Diamonds). The Queen of Diamonds is returned from dummy, declarer literally discarding the 7 of trump. He then leads the Jack of Hearts. If East covers with the King (of Hearts), he will take it with the Ace in dummy.

If East plays small, which he did in this case, in an endeavor to prevent the coup, the Queen was played from dummy, which held the trick.

Must Not Trump

The 10 of Diamonds is returned from dummy, West must not trump, but should discard the 5 of Hearts. Declarer now gets rid of the other excess trump - the 8 of Spades. This throws the lead into the declarer's hand and he leads the 8 of Hearts winning in the dummy with the Ace (of Hearts).

A small Heart is returned from dummy and West is forced to trump with the nine or Queen of Spades. In either case the declarer can overtrump and pick up the other one.

By getting rid of two excess trump in order to bring himself down to the same number of trump as held by his opponent, the declarer executed the play known as the double grand coup, and made his contract of four Spades.

 
North
AJ
 
 
 
 
West
Q9
 
 
 
 
East
 
K10
 
 
 
South (D)
 
32
 
 
 

End quoted article.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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