A grand coup is defined as a play, by which the declarer intentionally shortens his trump holding by ruffing a winner in order to achieve a finessing position over an adverse trump holding in an end position. The origin of this play technique is hidden within the game of Whist dating from the 19th century. The actual first performance remains unknown as well as the person, who executed this particular play technique.

The following example of a grand coup is from the publication The Encyclopedia of Card Play Techiques at Bridge authored by Mr. Guy Levé.

Quoted from the publication: In a grand coup declarer ruffs his own winners, either for transport between the hands, or to shorten his trumps, or simply because no card other than a trump is idle.

     
     

Illustration of the Grand Coup

Clubs are trump
 
North
A
 
A43
 
 
(Immaterial)  
East
2
 
5
Q5
 
South
 
 
2
AJ2
 

With the lead in dummy, the Ace should be ruffed to reduce declarer's trumps to the same length as East's. Then go bakc to dummy with the Ace fro the trump coup.

End quoted text.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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