A Clash Squeeze was first described by Mr. Chien-Hwa Wang in a series of articles appearing in The Bridge World in 1956 and 1957. After analyzing several holdings, he discovered that any player could squeeze in three suits, if the situation were distinguished by the presence of a special type of long menace. He authored the publication Practical Bridge Endings, published by B.T. Batsford, Ltd., in the year 1997, ISBN 13: 9780713481433.

Other Publications and Name

Note: Mr. Chien-Hwa Wang was also the author of the publication The Squeeze at Bridge, published by Everyman Publishers in the year 1993, ISBN-13: 978-1857445077. He also authored Unusual Squeezes at Bridge, published by L. Rex Offset Printing Company, Ltd., Hong Kong, in the year 1986.

Note: The name of the author in question is written differently on his publication titled The Theory of Games, published by the Oxford Science Publications in 1988 as the First Edition. The name on the front of the publications is written as Wang Jianhua. ISBN-10: 0198535600. It cannot be authenticated at this time whether the different spellings of the name refer to one author or to two separate authors. And assistance in this regard would be greatly appreciated.

     
     

There are many examples that Mr. Chien-Hwa Wang studied and analyzed, but we hope that the following examples supply a fundamental understanding of the principle and concept of the Clash Squeeze.

  North  
  A2  
West   East
K   J10
  South  
  Q  

The Queen in the hand of South is a clash menace against the King held by West.

  North  
  A75  
West   East
QJ   974
  South  
  K10  

The 10 in the hand of South is a clash menace against the Queen and Jack held by West.

In order for a Clash Squeeze to be present, basic conditions must first exist. Mr. Chien-Hwa Wang described in his articles three different pre-requirements.

A. The Simple Squeeze Positional

North
A2
AJ
West
K
KQ
A
East
J10
42
South
Q
3
K
A

South leads the Ace of Clubs. This play clash-squeezes West in three suits. If West decides to discard a Spade, South then plays the Queen of Spades, enters the dummy by playing the Three of Hearts to the Ace of Hearts, and plays the Ace of Spades. In the case that West discards a Heart or Diamond, South plays accordingly.

A.1. The Delayed or Secondary Simple Squeeze Positional

North
A2
K10
K4
West
K
QJ
Q65
East
J10
A3
87
South
Q
2
A32
A

Again, South leads the Ace of Clubs. This play clash-squeezes West in three suits. In this example, West must discard a Heart. South discards the Two of Spades from the dummy. In this situation, South then leads the Two of Hearts, West plays his last Heart, South plays the King of Hearts from the dummy, and East wins the trick with the Ace of Hearts. However, South has established a Heart trick in the dummy with the Ten of Hearts. This play is very similar to the Vise Squeeze analyzed and named by Mr. Terence Reese.

B. Double Squeeze
A Double Squeeze as described by Mr. Chien-Hwa Wang can be non-simultaneous and positional. The Double Clash Squeeze consists of two parts. First there is a clash-squeeze against one opponent, and then a Simple Squeeze is performed against the second opponent.

North
A2
K43
West
K
A
Q65
East
J10
K
87
South
Q
Q
A2
A

South leads the Ace of Clubs. This play clash-squeezes West. West must discard the Ace of Hearts. East is forced to choose a discard. South then plays to the King of Diamonds in dummy. South returns to his hand by leading a Diamond to his Ace of Diamonds. East is then squeezed in both Major suits. If East discards a Spade, then the Two of Spades in dummy becomes a winning trick. If East discards the King of Hearts, then the Queen of Hearts in the hand of South becomes a winning trick.

C. Double Squeeze - Simultaneous

North
A32
A
K
West
QJ
K3
A
East
987
Q4
South
K10
J2
A

South leads the Ace of Clubs. West must discard a Heart. South discards the King of Diamonds. West is clash-squeezed in both Major suits.

C.1. Double Squeeze - Secondary

North
A2
K10
West
K
QJ
Q
East
J10
A3
South
Q
2
3
A
South leads the Ace of Clubs. If West decides to discard a Heart, South discards a Spade from dummy. East discards a Spade. South then leads the Two of Hearts to the King of Hearts in the dummy, East wins the trick, but South has now established a Heart winner in the dummy.

If West decides to discard the King of Spades, South discards the Ten of Hearts from the dummy, and East discards his Three of Hearts. South then plays the Queen of Spades, playing the Two of Spades from dummy. South then leads the Two of Hearts, plays the King of Hearts from dummy, East wins the trick with the Ace of Hearts. East is now forced to lead a Spade, giving the last trick to the Ace of Spades in dummy.

Note: As an editorial to the magazine The Bridge World, Mr. Xiaobo Zhang of Riverside, New Jersey, United States, authored in October, 2002, A New Approach to Double Clash Squeeze. Source. This article has only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for future reference.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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