The Compound Trump Squeeze is one of the oldest squeezes formulated by the Whist player Mr. William Whitfield before the turn of the 20th century, that is before 1900.

There is very little information available about this gentleman, but it is believed that he was the Captain William Whitfield of the whaling ship John Howland, who rescued five shipwrecked Japanese fishermen in the year 1841. One of those rescued was named Manjiro Nakahama, who became the first Japanese person to actually reside in the United States of America after Captain William Whitfield accepted him into his home in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, United States.

The photograph below is a portrait of Captain William Whitfield. However, there can be no positive evidence produced that Captain William Whitfield is indeed the Whist person, who discovered the Compound Trump Squeeze.

Note: Any additional information regarding Mr. William Whitfield would be greatly appreciated.

     

Mr. William Whitfield defined a Compound Trump Squeeze as a squeeze in which at least one opponent is subject to a trump squeeze. The following illustration should suffice to clarify his definition.

North
9763
72
53
West
K5
J106
K98
East
Q763
Q3
J4
South
A1094
K8
A7
The situation is that South is the declarer. The trump suit is Spades. South is on lead. South needs all the remaining tricks to fulfill the contract.

South leads a low Heart and trumps in dummy. A trump is lead from dummy, and East discovers that he must discard a Club or a Diamond to avoid allowing Declarer to establish an additional Heart trick by ruffing.

South then discards that suit which East discards. A Diamond for a Diamond, or a Club for a Club. Whichever suit East discards, South discards, and South then leads that suit from the dummy and wins in his hand. If East discards a Diamond, South then leads a Diamond from the dummy, and wins with the King of Diamonds in his hand. If East discards a Club, then South leads a Club from the dummy, and wins the trick with the Ace of Clubs.

South then leads the Ace of Hearts, discards a Diamond from dummy, and leads another small Heart, which South ruffs in dummy.

When South leads the last trump card from the dummy, it becomes obvious to East that he must keep his last Heart and discard whichever Minor suit he has kept. South discards his last Heart on the last trump card, and then West is compound trump-squeezed in both Minor suits.

Ted's Bridge World

The following two bridge articles coined by Mr. William Whitfield have been preserved for posterity on the website of Mr. Ted Muller. The first article has been titled The Whitfield Six. Source. Source. This article has only been preserved and archived on this site for future reference. The origin of this double dummy puzzle is unknown.

The Whitfield Six - by William Whitfield

 
North
--
63
A9
82
 
West
73
--
K10
95
 
East
62
--
8
743
 
South
54
--
Q
J106
 

The trump suit is established as Hearts. South is on lead and must win all remaining tricks. This is the complete double dummy puzzle as presented by Mr. William Whitfield.

Solution to the Play

South leads the Jack, and unblocks the eight-spot. On the next trick a Spade is ruffed. Then declarer plays dummy's last Heart (the trump suit).

South drops the Queen and East also discards his last Diamond. West, however, is forced to guard the Diamond suit. Since a discard in the Club suit would enable a finesse in that suit, West is forced to throw his remaining Spade. Now the Ace squeezes East in both black suits.

The Whitfield Eight - by William Whitfield

The following two bridge articles coined by Mr. Willaim Whitfield have been preserved for posterity on the website of Mr. Ted Muller. The frist article has been titled The Whitfield Eight. Source. This article has only been preserved and archived on this site for future reference. The origin of this double dummy puzzle is unknown.

 
North
7432
74
74
--
 
West
--
KJ8
KJ8
KJ
 
East
--
Q9
Q0
Q954
 
South
--
A6
A6
A876
 

The trump suit is established as Spades. South is on lead and must win all remaining tricks. This is the complete double dummy puzzle as presented by Mr. William Whitfield.

Solution to the Play

South trumps a Club, then leads a Spade. East must hold onto Clubs to prevent establishment of declarer's long card, so he discards a red suit - say, Hearts. South also sheds a Heart, then plays a Heart to the Ace. The Ace is cashed, discarding a Diamond from dummy, and a Club is ruffed. Now, the lead of dummy's last Spade effects a double squeeze. East must guard Clubs and West must guard Hearts, so neither opponent can guard Diamonds.

Trap: cashing the Ace early would cause a premature commitment from dummy. East would hold the same red suit as the dummy, and the squeeze would evaporate.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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