This particular type of squeeze play constitutes a sequence of two squeezes, which has as a result the winning of two tricks.

Note: The strategy begins with a Triple Squeeze and is followed by a Simple Squeeze, both squeezes being against only one player.

Similar to a triple squeeze, all but two of the remaining tricks must be in hand before the squeeze can be executed. Several types of the Progressive Squeeze are outlined below.

Type One

North
AJ
K
8
6
West
KQ
A
KQ
East
76
4
5
7
South
5
6
AJ
A

The contract is immaterial. South is the declarer. South leads the Ace of Clubs. As a result West is squeezed in two suits. If West discards a Spade, South can cash two tricks in the Spade suit. As a consequence, West becomes also the target of an automatic squeeze in Hearts and Diamonds, which gives South an additional trick.

1. If West discards a Diamond, then South can cash two Diamond tricks. As a consequence, West becomes positionally squeezed in both Major suits, and this squeeze gives South an additional trick.
2. If West discards a Heart, then South enters the dummy to the Ace of Spades, plays the King of Hearts, and this play results in the automatic squeeze against West in both Spades and Diamonds.

Type Two

The following type of a progressive squeeze demands that certain requirements be fulfilled before it can be successful.

1. A one-card threat placed to the right of the opponent threatened.
2. The hand with the one-card threat has an entry in each of the other threat suits.
3. The hand opposite the one-card threat contains the squeeze card, the remaining threat cards, and entries in two of the three threat suits.

Example

North
A65
K
8
A7
West
72
8
5
854
East
QJ8
A
QJ9
South
K107
A
K105

The contract is immaterial. South is the declarer. South leads the Ace of Diamonds. As a result of this play East is squeezed in three suits. A Spade discard leads to three tricks for South. A Club discard leads to three tricks for South. Therefore, any discard by East leads to a simple squeeze for the loss of an additional trick by East.

Type Three

The following type of a progressive squeeze demands that certain requirements be fulfilled before it can be successful and occurs under the following conditions:

1. The condition of a double threat, also called an extended two-card menace.
2. The condition of a two one-card menaces opposite the extended threat.
North
AJ10
7
West
KQ
A
A
East
8
7
6
5
South
7
K
K
A

The contract is immaterial. South is the declarer. South leads the Ace of Clubs. As a result West is squeezed in three suits. West can discard a Spade, but South picks up two tricks. West can discard a Heart or a Diamond, but South continues with the discarded suit, cashing again two tricks and effecting an automatic squeeze against West.

     
     

This following type of progressive squeeze is also effective even if the holdings of East and West are interchanged, and becomes an automatic squeeze, as described by Mr. Chien-Hwa Wang in his publication Practical Bridge Endings.

Example

North
7
A6
A95
West
A
KQ
QJ4
East
8
8762
5
South
K
8
K103
A

The conditions for this automatic squeeze requires the following:

1. A one-card menace placed to the right of the opponent threatened.
2. A two-card menace in the hand opposite the one-card threat.
3. A twin entry menace, with a menace card accompanying each winner.

The contract is immaterial. South is the declarer. South leads the Ace of Clubs. West is squeezed in three suits. If West discards a Spade, South leads then the King of that suit, thereby squeezing West again in Hearts and Diamonds. If West discards a Heart, South gains two tricks by playing to his Hearts in the dummy, which then squeezes West in Spades and Diamonds.

If West discards a Diamond, South wins three tricks in Diamonds ending in his hand. On the third play of the Diamond, West is once again squeezed in both Major suits. This type of progressive squeeze is an automatic squeeze because the Spade in the dummy is a so-called idle card.

Another type of Progressive Squeeze

This type of progressive squeeze occurs when the squeeze card lies in the same hand as the one-card menace.

North
K3
K
K
8
West
742
7
6
East
QJ6
A
A
South
A865
A

The contract is immaterial. South is the declarer. South leads the Ace of Clubs. East is squeezed in three suits. It is irrelevant which card East discards, South wins all the remaining tricks.

Note: The examples of a progressive squeeze are numerous, and space does not allow inclusion of all, but the above examples illustrate the concept of this type of squeeze, which should be studied and learned. Many expert bridge players and analysts have conceived of this type of squeeze and their conclusions should enable the bridge player to more accurately judge the best plan of strategy, in order to obtain the better result.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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