This is a type of of squeeze play whereby the squeeze card is followed by the loss of one or more tricks to the opponents. This type of squeeze is also referred to as the Squeeze Without the Count or the Strip Squeeze.

There are several elements of play involved in performing this type of squeeze.

North
AJ
QJ
 
 
West
KQ
AK
 
 
East
54
 
6
8
South
64
5
 
A

The Principle of Squeeze Establishment is primary for a secondary squeeze, and requires essentially three characteristics:

1. One opponent has to possess a guard to a long menace in a suit, which the declarer wishes to establish.
2. One opponent has to possess a guard to a winner in a suit, which the declarer wishes to establish.
3. The squeeze must force the opponent to discard an additional winner or a card which may be led to his partner's winner.

The Principle of Squeeze Establishment was called the delayed duck squeeze by Mr. Clyde E. Love, and called the squeeze suitout by Mr. George S. Coffin. Authored by Mr. Clyde E. Love the delayed duck squeeze was published in The Bridge World, issue of July 1957, V 28 N 10.

The end play is based on a simple squeeze position except that the declarer has two losers with no convenient method to rectify the count, which means that the Rectification of the Count is only possible after the lead of the squeeze card.

In the above example, the declarer leads the Ace of Clubs. West must discard a Heart in order to protect his Spade guard. In this positional squeeze, the declarer can then play his 5 of Hearts in order to win a Heart trick, winning three tricks. This condition can also be accomplished through an automatic play and also through a criss-cross play. In all cases, one defender is forced to discard a second winner in the suit which the declarer is attempting to establish.

Squeeze Without the Count

The principle behind this form of secondary squeeze can be varied, altered, and/or modified to constitute a distinction between the designation secondary squeeze and a squeeze without the count. However, the variation is perhaps too slight as to be classified in an individual category, which would indicate a non-relatedness.

The following example may illustrate this distinction.

North
5
Q97643
J10
AKJ2
West
K74
AK82
75
Q983
East
QJ98
J105
843
1065
South
A10632
 
AKQ962
74

Via an individual partnership understanding Mr. Brady Richter, as South, and his partner reached a slam contract of 6 Diamonds. West had a difficult decision, based on the bidding style, to arrive at a lead. Instead of the lead of the King, which would have secured the contract for South, West decides on a passive lead of the 5 or trump.

South wins, cashes the Ace, ruffs a Spade, ruffs a Heart and runs trump. As soon as South leads his last trump, West has only room for only five cards. West must keep all four Club cards in the case that South decides to finesse to the Jack, thereby securing four Club tricks. West decides to discard the King. South discards a Club in the dummy at this trick. The dummy now contains only two Hearts and the AKJ.

South then leads a Club to the Ace and plays a small Heart with the intention of surrendering the lead. West leads a low Club, which South successfully finesses with the Jack and wins the remaining tricks.

Generally, in most squeezes and squeeze plays, the declarer must lose a trick or tricks, which carries the designation of rectifying the count, in order to successfully perform the squeeze. However, in this form of squeeze, West was squeezed before winning a trick and therefore carries the different and perhaps distinctive designation of squeeze without the count.

Romanet or Squeeze Elimination

In the following example, called a Romanet or a squeeze elimination, the opponent is squeezed out of a side winner or a card which may be led to partner's winner.

North
AJ
K6
 
West
KQ
A
A
East
5
4
86
 
South
8
5
3
A

South leads the Ace of Clubs and West is squeezed in three suits. The best discard for West is the Ace of Diamonds, a winner. South discards a Spade from the dummy. South concedes a Heart and establishes the King of Hearts in the dummy as a winner. In this positional squeeze, if the Ace of Diamonds lies with East, West still must discard a Diamond, his only link to the winner in his partner's hand.

Squeeze Throw-In or Strip Squeeze

The type of secondary squeeze, which requires a squeeze throw-In, also known as the strip squeeze, is when one opponent guards a two-card menace which is in the form of a tenace combination.

This opponent also holds a winner which corresponds to a low card in that suit held by the declarer. The intention of the declarer is to surrender or throw-in the lead to this opponent, forcing this opponent to lead into the tenace.

If the opponent has been stripped of exit cards in all other suits, then this particular opponent may still have too many winners in the throw-in suit. If this is the case, then the preliminary squeeze reduces the number of surplus winners which the defender can hold in the throw-in suit.

In the following example, the declarer may have two or more losers. A throw-in play results in two tricks for the declarer.

North
A
102
 
 
West
K
A3
 
East
 
J5
A
 
South
 
Q4
2
 

In a No Trump contract South, as declarer, leads his last Diamond. In the case that West discards a Heart, then the declarer also plays a small Heart from dummy. East wins the trick with the Ace and leads then a Heart. West wins with the Ace, but has to play to the Ace in the dummy.

If, however, West discards the King, then the declarer plays the Ace from the dummy. East, again, wins with the Ace and leads then a Heart. West wins with the Ace, but has to play a Heart to the Queen held by declarer.

Variations on the Combinations

The variations on the combinations held either by the declarer or one of the defenders are numerous and can be varied from example to example. The major tenace can be held by either opponent and also by the declarer.

The lead of a certain card forces the opponent to discard a winning trick, and after winning a trick is forced to lead in a manner which ensures the winning of an extra trick by the declarer. The end play is thus effective and the squeeze play has been successful.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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