This type of squeeze signifies that the strategy of the declarer is to threaten to take a successful finesse. The squeeze finesse is similar to the guard squeeze, whereby the opponents are not equally threatened. The main feature of the squeeze finesse is characterized by the presence of a symmetric menace which must be guarded with an equal number of cards by both opponents. The following examples, showing the different variations on the finesse, should clarify this concept.  Source: OEofB, 6th Edition, pp436.

A. Four-Card Squeeze Finesse Menace

A.1. Triple Tenaces

Example 1

  K9  
Q8   104
  J3  

Example 2

  K2  
Q7   104
  J9  

Either of the two examples above may lead to a squeeze or throw-in of either opponent.

A.2. Quadruple Tenaces

Example 1

  K8  
Q7   109
  J3  

Example 2

  K2  
Q7   109
  J8  

In the above two examples, only West can be thrown in successfully.

B. Six-Card Squeeze Finesse Menaces

B.1. Triple Tenaces

Example 1

  K93  
Q87   1052
  AJ2  

Example 2

  K32  
Q87   1054
  AJ9  

In the above two examples, either opponent may be thrown in.

B.2. Quadruple Tenaces

Example 1

  K87  
Q87   1054
  AJ2  

 Example 2

  K32  
Q87   1054
  AJ9  

In the above two examples, only West can be thrown in.

C. Squeeze Finesse Positions at No Trump

North
K8
K
7
West
Q73
3
East
109
A
A
South
J2
Q
A

South is the declarer and is on lead. South leads the Ace of Clubs and East is squeezed in three suits. East must discard a Spade. On the second trick, South leads the Jack of Spades hoping the West plays low and they play, if successful, captures the 10 of Spades held by East. If West decides to cover an honor with the Queen of Spades, then the 10 of Spades held by East falls on the King played from the dummy, which makes the 8 of Spades in the dummy a winner.  

D. Squeeze Finesse at Trumps

North
K10
AK
7
West
QJ
Q73
East
A7
1054
South
J86
5
A

South is the declarer playing a suit contract in Diamonds. South is on lead and plays the Ace of Clubs. West is squeezed. If West discards a Heart, the declarer then cashes the two Hearts in the dummy, returns to his hand by ruffing a Spade and takes the Jack of Hearts as a winner

If West decides to discard a Spade, the declarer can enter the dummy with a Heart, lead the King of Spades to force the Ace held by East, which South ruffs, and return to the dummy with a Heart to play the established 10 of Spades as a winner.

A squeeze play is defined as a play, generally by the declarer, which forces an opponent or both opponents to discard a winner, a potential winner, or a guard to a winner. All squeeze plays should be studied by the serious bridge player, because these plays are quite effective in earning that extra overtrick and especially in fulfilling the contract.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.  

 


     
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