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June 20, 2024

Ancient Fossils Push Back Origins of Photosynthesis by Billions of Years

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Jan 8, 2024

Fossils unearthed in Australia are providing remarkable new evidence that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved on Earth as early as 1.75 billion years ago, dramatically reshaping scientific understanding of when and how this pivotal biological process first emerged.

Revolutionary Find Points to Early Evolution of Photosynthesis

A team of paleobiologists from the University of New England announced Monday the discovery of exquisitely preserved fossil cyanobacteria containing recognizable photosynthetic structures dating back approximately 1.75 billion years. Found in marine shale deposits in northeastern Australia, these microscopic fossils are the oldest confirmed examples of oxygenic photosynthesis ever found.

“This discovery fundamentally changes our understanding of when oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that creates breathable oxygen, first evolved on planet Earth,” said lead researcher Dr. Ilya Bobrovskiy. “Previously, clear fossil evidence for oxygen production did not appear in the geological record until around 1 billion years ago. These Australian fossils push that date back by over 750 million years.”

Fossils Reveal Ancestral Photosynthetic Machinery

Analysis of the fossil cells under electron microscopy reveals the unmistakable presence of photosynthetic thylakoid membranes and carbon fixation pathways. While primitive forms of anoxygenic photosynthesis likely originated earlier, these newly described fossils contain the integral components required for oxidizing water and releasing oxygen as a byproduct.

“These fossils show all the features one would expect from a Complex Cyanobacterium well adapted to oxygenic photosynthesis,” explained Bobrovskiy. “The discovery suggests ancestors of modern cyanobacteria had already acquired the molecular equipment for oxygen production and photosystem II reaction centers at least 1.75 billion years ago, far earlier than previously realized.”

Discovery Reshapes Views on Evolution of Life

The findings, published Monday in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, have startling implications for understanding the very origins of oxygen-breathing life. At 1.75 billion years old, these fossils provide the earliest direct evidence for biological oxygen production on Earth.

Predating the “Great Oxidation Event” nearly 300 million years, the fossils suggest oxygenic cyanobacteria may have originated and diversified long before accumulating to high enough concentrations to transform Earth’s atmosphere.

“This is a massive discovery,” said biogeochemist Woodward Fischer, who was not involved in the study. “It shows life itself – in the form of photosynthetic microbes – was already profoundly shaping the planet Hundreds of millions of years before the red rust oxidized rocks signaled the accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere. This pushes the Great Oxidation Event back into what was formerly regarded the boring billion.”

The research team notes the fossils likely represent a “failed evolutionary experiment,” where oxygenic cyanobacteria appeared early but remained restricted to microbial mats and sediments before later spreading worldwide. Nonetheless, their early emergence still had influences, perhaps driving ultraviolet radiation changes or localized environmental oxidation.

“At the very least,” noted Bobrovskiy, “early cyanobacterial oxygen production may have stimulated evolutionary trajectories and planetary transitions that made possible the later rise of complex multicellular organisms like animals and plants.”

Uncovering Clues to Photosynthesis’ Evolutionary Past

The fossil discovery provides a unique window into photosynthesis’ formative stages while raising new questions about its evolutionary trajectory. As Dr. Bobrovskiy summarized:

“Did oxygenic photosynthesis arise just once, or have multiple independent origins across lineages? Do these fossils represent a long-lived but ultimately failed photosynthetic branch, or the direct ancestors of modern cyanobacteria? There is still so much to uncover about how and when this planet-changing biological innovation emerged.”

Additional research will focus on further interrogating the fossils’ molecular and biochemical properties while scouring ancient sediments for transitional forms. Each new find helps color in billion-year gaps of photosynthesis’ obscured early evolution and the transformative role biology itself played in enabling complex life.

“”We have been wrong this whole time about the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis,” concluded Bobrovskiy. These fossils are rewriting the book on a key innovation that literally allowed life as we know it to breathe.”

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By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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