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July 24, 2024

Apple Vision Pro Launches Without Support from Major Streaming Services

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Jan 21, 2024

Apple’s highly anticipated augmented reality headset, Vision Pro, is now available for pre-order ahead of its February 2 launch. However, the $3,500 device will lack dedicated apps from several major streaming platforms like Netflix, YouTube, and Spotify at release.

Key Streaming Services Absent from Launch

When Tim Cook unveiled Vision Pro last month, he emphasized entertainment and proclaimed it would “revolutionize watching video.” However, many top streaming providers seem unwilling to jump onboard the platform yet.

Vision Pro will launch with only 15 apps optimized for its immersive display and hand interactions, reports NotebookCheck. Cook confirmed that the device’s own Apple TV app will be available, but services like Netflix, YouTube, and Spotify will be notably absent.

Instead, Vision Pro users hoping to access these platforms will be limited to viewing them through the Safari web browser. While serviceable, lacking dedicated apps means missing out on potential AR, 3D, and immersive enhancements the headset could provide.

This omission of apps mirrors issues faced in the past by platforms like Windows Phone, highlights Windows Central. It also dampens the entertainment value proposition of the pricey Vision Pro.

Why Major Services Are Opting Out

But why are these streaming giants refusing to participate in Vision Pro’s launch? There appear to be several contributing factors:

Compatibility Concerns

Services like Netflix and Spotify want guarantees that Vision Pro can smoothly deliver their content while meeting quality standards. Creating dedicated apps requires allocated development resources.

Without assurances the investment will pay off in providing a better viewer experience, many services are taking a wait-and-see approach before fully supporting Vision Pro.

Business and Licensing Hurdles

There are likely complex business negotiations required before streaming platforms can directly integrate with Vision Pro. Vision Pro will take a 30% commission on revenues from apps, Netflix pointed out to The Morning Brew, which could create a sticking point.

VR Content Strategy Uncertainty

Questions also linger around how and if services plan to adapt or create content specifically for AR/VR experiences. Sources tell Bloomberg that Netflix, for example, wants
to better understand use behaviors before committing resources to VR content.

Workarounds for Streaming Media

Vision Pro users still have options to access key streaming services, though in a more limited capacity. Safari browsing allows video playback, and Mirror Mode can project content onto a virtual screen.

There are also early indications that some additional media apps may support Vision Pro. Disney+ is reportedly working on an app, sources told 9to5Mac. And Spotify has said it will “explore building an app in the future pending more information on Vision Pro use cases.”

For now, Apple itself touts its Apple TV+ service and Apple Music apps as go-to choices for media. However, the glaring absence of category leaders like Netflix and YouTube casts doubts on Vision Pro’s viability as an entertainment platform.

What Support for Vision Pro Looks Like

Very few of the tens of thousands of iOS apps have been optimized for Vision Pro so far. Porting iPad apps can work in the interim via Mirror Mode, but only provides limited functionality. Here is a breakdown of the status for the major players:

Company Native App at Launch Details
Netflix No Viewable through Safari browser only
YouTube No Viewable through Safari browser only
Spotify No Viewable through Safari browser only
Apple Yes Apple Music and Apple TV apps
Disney No App reportedly in development

Impact on Vision Pro’s Future

The lack of buy-in from key streaming services deals a blow to Vision Pro’s prospects as the revolutionary entertainment device Apple hyped it as. It also sets the stage for growing pains as Apple struggles to convince developers to build apps for its new platform.

However, the appeal of AR experiences and Vision Pro’s advanced technology could drive adoption over time. If users respond well and usage data validates developer investments, more streaming and app support seems inevitable.

For now, the absence looms large and will limit what users can do with the futuristic headset. But if Vision Pro takes off as a new computing paradigm down the road, this may just be the beginnings of growing pains for Apple’s latest gadget. Early tech adopters will pay premium prices regardless, while mainstream success still likely hinges on streaming media access advancements to come.

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AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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