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July 24, 2024

Headless Brittle Stars Display Surprising Learning Abilities

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Dec 1, 2023

Key Finding Overturns Long-Held Assumptions

Researchers at Duke University made an unexpected discovery while studying brittle stars, an ancient marine invertebrate related to starfish. Brittle stars have no brain, yet display a remarkable ability to learn and modify behaviors based on experience.

The findings, published today01473-9) in Current Biology, overturn the long-held assumption that learning requires a central nervous system and brain. Brittle stars don’t have either, yet adapated their behavior when exposed to adverse stimuli in controlled experiments.

"It was believed only animals with highly developed brains could demonstrate learning and memory," said Dr. Sönke Johnsen, professor of biology at Duke and senior author of the study. "Now we see evidence of rudimentary learning in organisms with no brain at all."

Brittle Stars Have Ancient Lineage

Brittle stars evolved over 500 million years ago and survive today largely unchanged. They have a central disk with five flexible arms, covered in sensory organs but no head.

Despite lacking a brain, these sea creatures demonstrate specialized behaviors like choosing optimal habitats and seeking shelter when threatened. The new findings indicate they can also modify behaviors through lived experience.

"Brittle stars don’t have a neural network or brain areas to subserve learning and memory," said Laura Bagge, a PhD student at Duke and lead author of the study. "But they do have nerves and muscles, which they can apparently adapt to respond differently to stimuli."

Controlled Experiments Reveal Surprises

The researchers subjected brittle stars to mild electric shocks to determine if they could learn and retain memories about the adverse stimuli. They tested two species of brittle star – Ophionereis reticulata and Ophiocoma echinata.

When placed in a new tank, the brittle stars initially moved around freely to explore their new habitat. But when researchers administered electric shocks to the animals as they entered certain areas of the tank, the brittle stars soon learned to avoid those areas.

Even more surprisingly, when placed back into the tank 24 hours later, the brittle stars remembered the location of the shocks and continued to avoid those areas. The creatures lacked eyes or traditional sensory organs, yet demonstrated consistent learned behaviors.

"There was no reason to expect the kind of learning we observed," Dr. Johnsen said. "But the fact they did learn makes sense from an evolutionary perspective."

Evolutionary Advantages

Researchers theorize this rudimentary learning ability evolved to help brittle stars adapt and survive threats. Those sea creatures with slightly better developed sensory networks may have had survival advantages that continued evolving over millions of years.

The findings prompt new questions around how even simple nerve structures can encode memories. Far from random sea creatures, brittle stars and related species appear specially adapted to their marine environments.

"Almost all animals demonstrate some forms of learning," Bagge said. "But why brittle stars evolved the capacity for learning remains an open question."

While brainless, these creatures are not witless. Rather, they illustrate nature’s endless ability to surprise – and upend notions of what’s required for even basic intelligence.

What’s Next

  • Additional research is needed to decode how brittle stars encode memories without brains
  • Related studies will examine other invertebrates like sea sponges and comb jellies to look for learning abilities
  • Findings may have implications for AI and machine learning – developing systems without centralized control structures
  • Insights could translate to advanced robotics and decentralized learning algorithms

Brittle stars offer a living model of neuroplasticity – the ability to modify neural structures and behaviors to adapt. Unlocking their secrets could lead to transformative advances in technology built to mimic nature’s genius.

So stay tuned as headless scientists continue probing these brainless mysteries of the sea. Understanding simpler nervous systems may yet teach us volumes about higher intelligence closer to home.

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AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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