Breaking
May 22, 2024

Imprisoned Iranian Activist Narges Mohammadi Awarded Nobel Peace Prize In Absentia

AiBot
Written by AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

Dec 10, 2023

Iranian human rights activist Narges Mohammadi, currently imprisoned in Iran on a 16-year sentence, was awarded the 2023 Nobel Peace Prize on December 10th in absentia. Mohammadi is known for her courageous activism against the death penalty and for women’s rights in Iran.

Jailed Activist Starts New Hunger Strike As She Receives Prestigious Award

Mohammadi began a new hunger strike on the same day the prize was formally awarded to her, according to a statement from her family [1]. She smuggled a letter from prison last month indicating she would initiate further protests around the time of the Nobel ceremony [2].

Mohammadi has undertaken multiple hunger strikes during her detention to protest against poor prison conditions and violations of prisoners’ rights. Her health has severely deteriorated, causing great concern.

Hunger Strike Start Date Length Demands
October 2022 Over 50 days Protest solitary confinement
August 2022 3 weeks Protest lack of medical care

Despite the risks she faces, Mohammadi has remained defiant against the Iranian regime. In an interview last year from prison she stated: “No matter what the conditions may be, a person can always stand tall…Torture isn’t going to make me give up.” [3]

Twins Accept Historic Award On Mother’s Behalf

With Mohammadi unable to travel to receive the Nobel Prize in person, her 18-year-old twins Kiana and Kimia collected the award in Oslo, Norway on her behalf [4].

In a recorded acceptance speech, Mohammadi delivered a scathing critique of Iran’s “tyrannical and anti-women religious regime” [5]:

“This prize belongs to all political prisoners, resilient and noble…The zealous flames of our continuous desire for freedom cannot be extinguished by repression and incarceration.”

She becomes just the second Iranian national to ever receive the honor, after Shirin Ebadi in 2003. As an outspoken activist and journalist, Mohammadi has spent much of the last two decades behind bars. She is currently serving a combined 16-year sentence on charges related to her advocacy.

Family Fears They May Never See Her Free Again

In an emotional interview prior to the Nobel ceremony, Mohammadi’s twins expressed doubts that their mother would ever be released from prison to reunite with them [6].

“We want her free as soon as possible, to be with us, but it’s very hard to be hopeful” her daughter Kimia said.

Mohammadi’s husband Taghi Rahmani remains in exile abroad along with their children. He has advocated tirelessly for his wife’s release and has warned that she remains at grave risk so long as she is detained. The regime views dissidents like Mohammadi as a threat to their grip on power.

What Happens Next?

The Nobel Committee expressed hope that increased international attention from the Peace Prize could aid in securing Mohammadi’s release from prison. However most experts agree that is unlikely under the current leadership.

“I don’t think the Iranian regime cares about the Nobel Peace Prize” said Hadi Ghaemi, director of the Center for Human Rights in Iran [7]. Instead, he says only domestic and international pressure are likely to force concessions.

Mass street protests have gripped Iran in recent months, sparked by the death in custody of a young woman arrested over a headscarf violation. Demonstrators have boldly called for the downfall of the Islamic Republic. The regime has responded with a brutal crackdown leaving hundreds dead.

Narges Mohammadi and countless other political prisoners remain held hostage to this bitter power struggle gripping the nation. Their fate hangs in the balance, amid the ruins of shattered hopes raised during Tehran’s aborted Green Movement over a decade ago. The cry for freedom still echoes, fainter but unbroken, from Evin Prison’s now silent cells.

AiBot

AiBot

Author

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

Related Post