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July 18, 2024

Mystery of Odd Radio Circles Finally Solved

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Jan 8, 2024

Astronomers have finally uncovered the origin of one of space’s most bewildering phenomena – odd radio circles (ORCs). These giant rings can span millions of light years across, dwarfing even the largest galaxies, yet their source has remained an enigma since their initial discovery in 2019. Now, analysis from the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope shows that ORCs arise from ancient bursts of star formation that eject powerful winds into intergalactic space.

The Hunt for ORCs’ Roots

ORCs were first detected in 2019 by chance, as researchers were testing a new technique to map neutral hydrogen gas across the cosmos using ASKAP. The odd rings lit up radio maps of the sky, prompting a flood of speculation as to their nature.

Early hypotheses ranged from remnants of ancient quasars to jets from supermassive black holes. However, none could fully explain key ORC properties like their vast sizes and symmetrical structures. The solution would require peering back across cosmological timescales.

Over the next few years, surveys revealed around 500 ORCs scattered across the southern sky. Analysis also uncovered crucial clues – many ORCs resided inside or around galaxy groups and clusters up to a billion light years away. This hinted these mega-structures could originate from ancient energetic events tied to large-scale environments that fuel rapid star birth.

Our Galactic Past Holds the Key

In a new study published in Nature, an Australian-led team analyzed ORCs using a sample of 17 rings detected with ASKAP. By mapping their radio emissions in detail, researchers found these giant halos surround reservoirs of hot gas linked to galaxy groups and clusters.

Crucially, this hot gas matches predictions from models of powerful winds driven by intense bursts of star formation. Lead author Professor Ray Norris at Western Sydney University explains:

“In the early Universe, there were hot stars and explosions everywhere, and the winds they produced were fierce and chaotic. These winds blew an enormous bubble in the hot gas around them which swept up more hot gas from the surroundings as it expanded.”

To put numbers on it, up to 100 million stars would have formed before exploding as supernovae in these ancient starbursts. The combined energy of their stellar winds and supernova shockwaves then carved out Mpc-scale cavities in intergalactic gas.

Over billions of years, the bubbles expanded and faded, leaving behind the faint radio rings we now detect as ORCs. Co-author Professor Elaine Sadler at the University of Sydney summarizes:

“We have shown that odd radio circles are the ghosts of massive starbursts from the early Universe, haunting galaxy clusters with an enormous halo.”

What Lies Ahead

With the root cause now uncovered, there is still much to unpack about these cosmic rings. Upcoming surveys by ASKAP, MeerKAT, and eventually the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will discover more ORCs to study their life cycles and environment dependencies in greater detail.

The table below summarizes the key findings from this discovery:

Key Property Finding
Origin Remnants of ancient energetic winds driven by intense star formation
Lifespan Expanding bubble walls from a billion years ago
Size Can exceed 3 million light years across
Location Often surround galaxy groups and clusters

These mega-structures also trace reservoirs of matter from across cosmic time – material expelled from early galaxies that may eventually rain back down to fuel future stellar nurseries.

Understanding ORCs can therefore unravel key processes in the evolution of cosmic structure. Uncovering more of these ghostly rings will ultimately write new chapters in the history of our Universe.

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AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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