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February 26, 2024

New study reveals strong link between autoimmune diseases and perinatal depression

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Jan 13, 2024

A comprehensive new study published in the BMJ has uncovered a strong association between women with autoimmune diseases and an increased risk of developing perinatal depression. The research also found that perinatal depression is linked to a higher risk of death for mothers in the years following pregnancy.

Key findings from the Karolinska Institutet study

Researchers at Sweden’s prestigious Karolinska Institutet analyzed data on over 1 million women and found that those with autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus had almost double the risk of being diagnosed with perinatal depression compared to women without these conditions.

Additionally, the study revealed that women experiencing depressive symptoms during or after pregnancy had a significantly elevated long-term mortality risk, with the highest incidence of death by suicide.

Dr. Hanna Augustsson, lead author of the study, said:

“We found a clearly elevated risk of being diagnosed with perinatal depression among women with pre-existing autoimmune disease. There seems to be a bidirectional link where autoimmune disease predisposes women to perinatal depression, and perinatal depression triggers onset of some autoimmune diseases.”

Understanding the link between autoimmune conditions and depression

Experts theorize that the chronic inflammation and immune activation seen in autoimmune disorders could contribute to changes in brain chemistry, making some women vulnerable to mood disorders like depression.

Equally, the hormonal shifts and psychosocial stressors around childbirth may act as environmental triggers that activate underlying autoimmunity in genetically predisposed women.

Dr. Augustsson explained:

“There are likely complex neuroendocrine-immune interactions at play. We urgently need more research to unravel the mechanisms, and also to find effective screening tools to identify women most as risk.”

Lasting mental health impact of perinatal depression

Perhaps most striking is the revelation that women experiencing depression linked to pregnancy have a persisting long-term risk for severe depressive episodes, self-harm and suicidal behavior.

Compared to women with no history of perinatal depression, those diagnosed with it had:

  • 3 times higher rate of suicide
  • 4 times higher rate of attempted suicide
  • More than double the risk of severe depression

This enduring susceptibility spanned the 5 to 19 years after delivery that were analyzed in the study.

Perinatal depression – an overlooked public health issue

Mental health experts have described the findings as being of major public health significance.

“The study highlights that perinatal depression can have serious and potentially fatal consequences for mothers, even many years after having a child,” said Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, Professor of Psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

He continued:

“The findings call for urgent action to establish integrated care pathways so that high-risk women with autoimmune issues receive appropriate depression screening and support throughout the perinatal period. We also need to provide long-term follow up, to safeguard their ongoing mental health.”

Way forward: a multidisciplinary approach

In light of the study revelations, researchers are advising a coordinated cross-specialty initiative to tackle this issue.

“Obstetricians, rheumatologists, neurologists and psychiatrists should collaborate to provide holistic care for women with autoimmune disease planning or going through pregnancy,” said senior study author Dr. Lars Alfredsson, Professor of Epidemiology at Karolinska Institutet.

“We have an opportunity here to dramatically improve outcomes for both mother and child through integrated screening, treatment and follow-up.”

The researchers emphasize the need to establish clear consensus guidelines and health policies around:

  • Routine depression screening for all pregnant women and new mothers, especially those with autoimmune conditions
  • Protocols for multimodal depression treatment plans during the perinatal period
  • Long-term monitoring of all women diagnosed with perinatal depression

There are also calls for more research funding and awareness campaigns focused specifically on maternal mental health.

Conclusion

This research provides robust evidence of a two-way association between autoimmune diseases and perinatal depression. It also indicates that perinatal depression can have grave long-term consequences like elevated suicide risk.

There is now an urgent need to prioritize the perinatal mental health of all women – especially those suffering from autoimmune issues. A collaborative public health approach that integrates depression screening, treatment and follow-up into routine prenatal and postpartum care could help safeguard the wellbeing of many vulnerable mothers.

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AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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