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July 24, 2024

Semen Microbiome Linked to Male Infertility

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Jan 21, 2024

New research has uncovered an association between the bacteria found in semen and male fertility, providing potential insights into the mysteries of infertility. Analyzing semen samples from healthy and infertile men, scientists identified differences in the microbial composition that may impact sperm function and viability.

Semen Hosts Diverse Bacterial Communities

Once believed to be sterile, semen has now been shown to harbor complex communities of bacteria, known collectively as the semen microbiome. Using genomic sequencing, researchers from China identified 191 bacterial species residing within semen [1].

This microbial ecosystem varies between individuals but falls into several broad categories dominated byPrevotella, Lactobacillus, Finegoldia, and Anaerococcus bacteria. Compared to other body sites, the semen microbiome more closely resembles that of the gut and mouth [2].

Dysbiosis Correlates with Impaired Fertility

Evaluating the semen microbiome in 98 fertile and 105 infertile men, Chinese scientists found significant differences between the groups [1].

Infertile men exhibited reduced microbial diversity together with overabundance of Lactobacillus and Staphylococcus bacteria. They also showed depletion of bacteria associated with healthy sperm function including Prevotella, Finegoldia, and Anaerococcus.

Microbial Trait Fertile Men Infertile Men
Diversity High Low
Lactobacillus Low High
Prevotella High Low

This state of dysbiosis points to a role of semen bacteria in regulating male reproductive capacity.

Microbes May Influence Sperm Performance

How might semen microbes impact fertility? Researchers propose several mechanisms [1,3]:

  • Inflammation – Harmful bacteria trigger inflammation, damaging sperm.
  • Toxins – Bacterial products directly poison sperm.
  • Nutrition – Beneficial microbes supply nutrients to nourish sperm.

Indeed, the team showed that missing beneficial bacteria in infertile men associated with measures of sperm dysfunction like reduced motility and abnormal morphology [1]. Restoring a healthy microbiome balance could therefore promote sperm vitality.

Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications

Characterizing the seminal microbiome now provides an emerging diagnostic tool for male infertility. Testing semen bacteria may aid clinical evaluation and personalize treatment strategies based on underlying dysbiosis [4].

Specific microbial signatures could signify different pathological processes amenable to tailored therapies [3]. For example, inflammation-related dysbiosis might warrant anti-inflammatory agents alongside antibiotics.

Restoring missing microbes through probiotic approaches also shows promise to correct dysbiosis-driven infertility [5]. But much work remains to validate microbiome-based diagnostics and therapies.

Closer Study Needed of Microbe-Sperm Interactions

Despite compelling associations between semen bacteria populations and sperm dysfunction, direct causal evidence remains limited. Clarifying how microbial residents interact with sperm cells and impact their fertilizing capability requires deeper investigation [4].

Key questions include:

  • Do specific strains directly infect sperm cells?
  • Can secreted bacterial compounds be isolated that harm or help sperm?
  • Will probiotic formulations with defined microbes conclusively cure dysbiosis-associated infertility?

Carefully controlled studies tracking sperm performance metrics with manipulated microbiome compositions will shed light on these issues. Insights gleaned may unlock new fertility treatments targeting the seminal microbiome.

Conclusion

Emerging research revealing semen’s rich microbial inhabitants provides tantalizing clues to solving male infertility, responsible for over half of all cases. While correlations between dysregulated semen bacteria and impaired sperm paint an intriguing picture, definitive proof of causative microbe-sperm interactions remains wanting.

As scientists probe deeper into microbial impacts on sperm quality, we move closer to tapping into microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for stubborn infertility. Characterizing each man’s unique seminal microbiome signature may open new fertile ground for enhancing reproductive outcomes.

References

  1. Li, D. et al. Semen microbiome associated with sperm quality and male fertility in reproductive-aged men. Microbiome 10, 8 (2022).
  2. Hou, D. et al. Microbiota of the Semen From Healthy and Infertile Men. Front. Cell. Infect. Microbiol. 10, (2020).
  3. Ruan, Y. et al. Potential role of semen microbiome in human Sperm health and function: possibilities for diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. Antioxidants 11, 375 (2022).
  4. Gonçalves, L. F. et al. Semen microbiome: how far are we from using it in andrology clinical practice? Andrologia 55, e14507 (2023).
  5. Torres, P. J. et al. Semen bacteria as targets for treatment of infertility. Reproduction 167, R247–R258 (2022).
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AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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