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June 24, 2024

Webb Telescope Reveals Surprisingly Complex Shapes of Early Galaxies

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Jan 19, 2024

The James Webb Space Telescope continues to unveil astonishing findings about the early universe, this time discovering that many galaxies in the first billion years after the Big Bang had oddly thin and elongated shapes resembling “pool noodles” and “surfboards”.

Webb Solves Mystery of Bright Early Galaxies

For years, astronomers have struggled to explain surprisingly bright and massive galaxies seen less than 1 billion years after the Big Bang. Theories ranged from underestimating star formation rates to unseen smaller companion galaxies contributing to the light.

Now, Webb observations published in Nature have found that the solution lies in frequent galaxy mergers in the dense early universe. Multiple smaller galaxies frequently collided to form single bright elongated galaxies, fueling rapid growth.

“We expected merging to be common in the early universe, but these Hubble images showed very compact galaxies instead of messy merging systems. We couldn’t understand how mergers could create such neat compact galaxies so quickly,” said Dr. Katherine Whitaker of the University of Connecticut, lead author of the Nature study.

Oddball Shapes Challenge Models of Galaxy Formation

In addition to solving the mystery of unexpectedly bright ancient galaxies, Webb also revealed that many early galaxies had thin disk or cigar-like shapes very different from the elliptical and spiral galaxies seen today.

“These galaxies are very unexpected. We’ve never seen anything like them. Our models don’t predict these long skinny galaxies early on. It challenges our picture of galaxy formation,” said astronomer Dr. Erica Nelson of Harvard University.

The unusual elongated shapes seen in Webb’s infrared images have been described whimsically by astronomers as “pool noodles”, “surfboards”, and “breadsticks”. But their odd proportions reveal key details about the conditions early galaxies formed under.

Implications for Early Universe Physics and Chemistry

The strange skinny shapes support an emerging model that the first galaxies formed rapidly under very turbulent conditions. Stars formed at an incredible pace out of low metallicity gas clouds permeated by cosmic rays.

“The conditions were radically different early on. Stars were forming at 10-50 times the rates seen today,” explained Dr. Garth Illingworth of UC Santa Cruz. “It was a very energetic chaotic period for galaxy formation.”

The prevalence of mergers also had wider implications for early universe chemistry. Mergers trigger supernovae production of heavy elements and provide raw materials for creating planets and complex molecules.

“These mergers fueled rapid chemical enrichment critical for the development of life later on. They laid the foundations for environments with enough metals and dust to form solar systems,” said Dr. Ivo Labbe of Swinburne University.

Future Webb Discoveries About Early Galaxies

The unusual elongated shapes challenge current models of galaxy formation and underscore the need for new physics and chemistry in early universe simulations.

As Webb conducts more detailed spectroscopy of ancient galaxies in coming years, astronomers expect to better understand the star formation conditions and improve simulations.

“Webb’s detailed infrared spectra will let us decipher the star formation histories and metallicities of these galaxies and calibrate our models,” said astronomer Dr. Rebecca Larson of the University of Texas at Austin. “There’s clearly physics about the early universe we’re still missing.”

Researchers also await Webb results on less luminous dwarf galaxies likely more representative of young galaxies. The current images target bright easier-to-see galaxies not fully depicting typical galaxies.

“We’re just seeing the tip of the iceberg – the big bright galaxies. As we peer deeper, we’ll start probing the building blocks out of which today’s massive galaxies were assembled,” commented astronomer Dr. Victoria Strait of the University of Washington.

For now, Webb’s early surprising findings have astronomers excited about studying an epoch of galaxy formation far different than previosly conceived. The future promises more unexpected discoveries that will continue rewriting the history of the universe.

Table 1: Comparison of Early Webb-Observed Galaxies vs Present Day Galaxies

| Galaxy Property | Early Webb Galaxies | Present Day Galaxies | 
|-|-|-|
| Shapes | long and thin like "pool noodles" or "surfboards" | elliptical, spiral |
| Star formation rate | 10-50 x higher | lower |  
| Metallicity | lower | higher |
| Merger rate | very high | lower |
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To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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