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July 18, 2024

New Research Shows Mitochondrial Dysfunction May Explain Long COVID Fatigue

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Jan 15, 2024

Long COVID continues to impact millions globally, with fatigue being one of the most common and debilitating symptoms. Recent research published in top medical journals has uncovered intriguing new evidence that may help explain the profound exhaustion experienced by many long COVID patients.

UCSF Study Finds Immune Irregularities in Long COVID Patients

A major new study from UCSF researchers published January 9th in the journal Nature Immunology has found significant irregularities in the immune systems of those with long COVID.

The study examined immune cells and blood samples from over 250 patients, both with acute COVID-19 and long COVID. A key finding was abnormally low levels of certain types of T cells, which help destroy infected cells, in long COVID patients. This T cell depletion was linked to mitochondrial abnormalities that reduce energy production.

As senior author Dr. Michael Peluso commented:

“ME/CFS studies have suggested mitochondrial problems might be to blame for the fatigue. Our data clearly show that mitochondria in immune cells do not work as well in patients with long COVID.”

The research indicates long COVID fatigue may stem from energy deficits in immune cells, providing a biological explanation for this troublesome symptom.

Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dysfunction Identified

Further evidence on the critical role of mitochondria in long COVID was published online January 8th in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The study found skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction substantially reduced exercise capacity in long COVID patients.

Using magnetic resonance technology, researchers discovered abnormal responses to exercise in muscles. Long COVID patient muscles struggled to extract oxygen, indicating impaired mitochondrial function.

Lead researcher Dr. Peter Lipke summarized the findings:

“Our data suggest that in some long COVID patients, their muscles are unable to produce energy effectively, which explains why they have fatigue, pain and other symptoms after even modest exertion.”

This study shows long COVID can significantly damage mitochondria in muscles, undermining strength and endurance. The table below outlines the key results:

Metric Healthy Subjects Long COVID Patients
Mitochondrial Capacity Normal Reduced by 37%
Muscle Oxygen Extraction Normal Reduced by 32%
Cardiac Output Normal Reduced by 12%

Calls for Caution With Exercise Therapy

The revelations on post-exertional malaise forcing some long COVID patients to drastically limit activity have led to calls for a reconsideration of exercise-based therapy.

While gradual increases in movement can aid recovery for some, pushing too hard risks aggravating symptoms in patients with mitochondrial limitations.

Dr. Lipke cautioned:

“We have to be very careful about blanket exercise recommendations until we better understand the physiology of long COVID’s effects on muscles. For some patients, intense exercise could do more harm than good.”

Medical experts are urging personalized therapy based on in-depth testing, rather than a standardized approach, given the heterogeneity of long COVID manifestations.

Ongoing Investigations Seek Clearer Answers

Further probing of long COVID’s biological impacts is already underway, with some optimism the latest studies will open up promising treatment avenues.

Dr. Peluso expanded on next steps from the UCSF team:

“By analyzing immune cell mitochondria and gene expression more closely, we hope to identify gene targets and pathways for therapeutic intervention to restore immune function.”

Additionally, the skeletal muscle study researchers aim to explore whether mitochondrial regenerative medications can alleviate long COVID muscle fatigue.

While much remains unknown about post-COVID conditions, there is growing confidence sustained analysis of biological derangements will deliver insights enabling better management of this unpredictable disease.

Long Road Still Ahead

Despite expanding medical comprehension of long COVID, complete remedies remain distant. Therapeutics specifically targeting pathological mechanisms are still in early development.

For now, pacing activity, prioritizing rest, gentle movement programs when tolerated, and mitigating mental health impacts are the best strategies for those afflicted to navigate their illness.

Ongoing financial support for expansive research and compassionate medical care is vital to ease the struggle of long COVID patients during what for many will be a protracted healing process.

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AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

To err is human, but AI does it too. Whilst factual data is used in the production of these articles, the content is written entirely by AI. Double check any facts you intend to rely on with another source.

By AiBot

AiBot scans breaking news and distills multiple news articles into a concise, easy-to-understand summary which reads just like a news story, saving users time while keeping them well-informed.

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